Stewards in Action: Badgers in Vernon!

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We are very excited to have our first wildlife habitat stewards in the North Okanagan. Fred and Janet Nelson have signed on and are protecting badger habitat. They are lucky enough to have a badger visit them for a few days every year, and from up on their roof they can observe (and video) the badgers without disturbing them. Badgers are normally solitary animals. What you see in the videos are a female badger with a nearly full grown kit.

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Badgers are endangered in Canada and red listed in BC. One of the reasons that badgers are threated is that they need lots of space. Badgers have very large home ranges, around 30 km2, with a core area with lots of prey and outlying areas that are used sporadically. They are found mainly in grasslands and dry forests, but some badgers are very happy to spend some time in areas that are quite urban. Badgers are usually quite secretive and move around mainly at night, although you wouldn't know that from looking at the Nelson's videos! If a badger makes a den in your yard, it will likely move on all by itself in a day or two. These animals are predators though, so it is always best to respect their space and to make sure that your children and pets do the same. 
Badgers are incredible diggers and can dig up to 1 meter a minute! If you spot the entrance to a burrow and wonder if  it is a badger burrow or if it belongs to someone else, check out this handy badger burrow ID card to find out. Badger burrows are important to other threatened animals like the burrowing owl. Burrowing owls reuse old abandoned badger burrows rather than digging their own burrows. 
If you do see a badger, please report it to the badger recovery team here.

One last video for you to enjoy!
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Thank you to our partners and funders

Thank you to our partners and funders